An analysis of symbols in war photographer by carol ann duffy

For the one who sees the realities of war first hand, life outside of war is hard to imagine. This continues the serious, sombre mood of this poem. Duffy also distinguishes the fields in England with those abroad — as if the photographer believes English fields are not minefields.

War Photographer By Carol Ann Duffy

She is simply there to report and take pictures of life there. The vague features of the man seem to the photographer, like the spirit of the soldier and he remembers the moment when he took that picture. They do not know how it feels to see that child first hand, and to know that the child has seen you, and yet be able to do nothing to help save for spreading awareness of the situation through the photos taken.

This was really a very traumatic situation for the photographer. There is no name given to the photographer.

War Photographer By Carol Ann Duffy

The imagery provided here will also contrast with the images the speaker presents throughout the rest of the poem, allowing the readers to understand the irony of the fact that some people get to enjoy wealth and ease while others suffer war and tragedy. She is the most admired and recognized poet in Britain.

This also reflects the contrast between this stanza and the second, suggesting that when it comes down to it, human nature, by instinct, will cause one to take care of himself first and foremost. The poet once again takes the photographer to his painful memories.

They can never be like the photographer who himself has seen the difference between the world of war and the world of baths and beer. One might even forget that it exists. Both of them were well-respected stills photographers, with specialization in war photography. In a simile where the poet compares the photographer to a priest represents his seriousness toward his job, and how by taking their photographs, he helps those who are helpless.

The photographer says that though he has got a collection of hundreds of war photographs, the editor will just pick five to six photos, as per his requirements, and publish them with the story covered relevant to the war.

The enjambment is used in this stanza which makes the poem dramatic and emphasizes the imageries. In a simile where the poet compares the photographer to a priest represents his seriousness toward his job, and how by taking their photographs, he helps those who are helpless.

The vague features of the man seem to the photographer, like the spirit of the soldier and he remembers the moment when he took that picture. The final stanza takes on a detached tone, as the photographer thinks of how from the hundred photos that he has taken, each telling its own chilling tale of agony and pain, his editor will randomly select a handful to print in the newspaper.

Duffy also distinguishes the fields in England with those abroad — as if the photographer believes English fields are not minefields. He knows that people back at home would glance at these, in the afternoons and feel sorrow for a minute before moving on with their lives.

However, the photographer is respectful towards them. The photographer shows sympathy towards the children suffering from war. She cannot do much to help the child. Duffy depicted the trauma that he had to face against by using a symbolic association Instead of using an ordinary language so that the word can carry out lots of possible meaning.

This reveals the injustice that goes on in a world in which small, innocent babies are casualties of war.

War Photographer

This emotive language suggests how he is now seeing the soldiers die instead of then when he was taking their photographs. Duffy is immensely fascinated by what makes someone do such a job and how they feel about being in situations where a choice often has to be made between either helping or recording horrific events.

This offers more insight into the reason some can enjoy riches while others starve. Love can also be deadly or dangerous. The final stanza takes on a detached tone, as the photographer thinks of how from the hundred photos that he has taken, each telling its own chilling tale of agony and pain, his editor will randomly select a handful to print in the newspaper.

The photographer has returned to England from an assignment abroad. In the second stanza, Duffy creates vivid images of misery during doing his work. The image also brings to mind the visions of a graveyard scene where the spools of film are gravestones.

Stanza 2 Here, the speaker recalls a picture she took is Ascot. It is simplified and less human-artistic which causes reader to feel the sombre mood of poem.

He can make them see what he sees by capturing the pain in photos, but he cannot make them feel what he feels, for there is no way he can show them his memories. He sees the ghosts of dead soldiers and dead people in the prints of the photographs that he has developed.Critical Analysis of War Photographer by Carol Ann Duffy In his darkroom he is finally alone with spools of suffering set out in ordered rows.

Carol Ann Duffy’s poem, War Photographer, can be read in full here. Techniques Used in War Photographer In the line ‘spools of suffering set out’ the poet uses alliteration/metaphor wherein the harsh ‘S’ sound reminds us of the harsh world he operates in.

War Photographer By Carol Ann Duffy Prev Article Next Article 66The war photographers are those real people who endanger their lives to take the photographs of war, and help us (readers) visualize the horrors of war anywhere in the world. This poem, War Photographer, centers around the tragic, comparing poverty to leisure.

The author, Carole Satyamurti, is known for facing pain and suffering head on in her works of poetry. The author, Carole Satyamurti, is known for facing pain and suffering head on in her works of poetry.

War Photographer by Carole Satyamurti

Carol Ann Duffy The first female, Scottish Poet Laureate in the role's year history, Carol Ann Duffy's combination of tenderness and toughness, humour and lyricism, unconventional attitudes and conventional forms, has won her a very wide audience of readers and listeners. Describe important symbols in the texts you have studied and analyse how the symbols helped develop important ideas.

In the poems 'Valentine' and 'War Photographer' by Carol Ann Duffy much emphasis is put on the use of symbolism to develop important ideas. In 'Valentine' an onion is used as an unconventional symbol of love.

Download
An analysis of symbols in war photographer by carol ann duffy
Rated 3/5 based on 75 review